My Cart

Close

Finding your prostate & queefing

   Featured - Tantus Prostate PlayNjoy Pfun, and Sliquid H20

 

So during sex, I queef alot. I just got out of a long term relationship and I want to start dating / hooking up, but I’m nervous the person I’m going to hook up with is gonna laugh at me. How can I get it to stop?

Thanks for your question! Let’s delve into what a ‘queef’ actually is.

Queefing, or vaginal flatulence, is a sudden expulsion of air from the vagina. These pockets of air become trapped inside the ridges and folds of vaginal canal for many different reasons, usually to do with movement. This usually happens during sex, or a physical activity like yoga, but can also be completely random (yay!). Queefing is especially common during sexual activity due to toys, fingers, and pensis pushing air into the vaginal canal, combined with the vagina expanding due to arousal.

With the unfortunate medical name — ‘vaginal flatulence’, queefing often gets thought of as a fart. However this is not the case. Farts are gas from digestion being released from the anus. Your vagiana is an independent structure that has nothing to do with the digestion process.

There is nothing harmful about queefing, unless the air released has an odor. If so, this maybe a condition called colovaginal fistula, which is where the inside of the vaginal canal has a tear, exposing it to the colon. If you think this is the problem, see your doctor right away.

The thing about queefing is there is no cure, or special trick to stop yourself from doing it. Every person who has a vagina has or will experience a queef, whether it’s in the bedroom or at the gym. While your individual vaginal shape may cause you to be more prone to trapping air, rest assured it’s a normal, healthy bodily function. Anyone you might be sleeping with in the future should understand and respect that.

Since you are aware that this is a common thing to expect when you have sex, if it makes you more comfortable, you could have a quick conversation beforehand, to give your partners a heads up. This isn’t necessary however. The most common reaction will most likely be your partner will ignore the queef, too busy with the task at hand. A conversation before the action will be more for your own piece of mind.

Remember there is no need to feel bad or apologetic for your body’s natural functions. A little giggle of embarrassment may slip out, but don’t feel obligated to say you’re sorry for a queef. Sex is messy and bodies do embarrassing things sometimes, but it’s all part of the fun and intimacy. Don’t let it hold you back from getting yours!

Hello You!

Join our mailing list